Escape Site

Changing my behaviour part 2

Part 2 in our Changing My Behaviour series is about paying attention to our own behaviour. Once we acknowledge that we’re acting in a negative way, we can change. We’ve seen that our Behavioural Change Programmes can have very real benefits for abusers. These can also lead to happier and more equal lives for those still in relationships. One of our clients opened up about how the Programme helped him.

What difference has attending a Behavioural Change Program made to you?

I have started paying more attention to my behaviour and of the behaviour of others. It’s made me want to avoid others with negative traits. As well as not express distinctive behaviour towards others because I’ve learned of the effects it can have.

I have learnt that I don’t have to be aggressive or violent which often leads to negative impacts on people. This can make a person feel uncomfortable and in return give others the means to be towards me. It’s made me want to be more vigilant in the future towards meeting new people or potential partners.

I have learnt that positive scenarios follow if I do not lose control of myself and become the perpetrator. Which leads me to perceiving myself toxic. Furthermore, it has made me aspire to become a better person. For me and my family. I know my worth and what I should or should not involve myself with.

What would you say to other men who need help to address their behaviours in relation to Domestic abuse?

This course will benefit you massively. As long as you’re willing to embrace what you are taught and make changes to yourself or to your life. Life isn’t just about how you feel, what you’re dealing with or what you think you’re dealing. It’s just as much about the people you involve yourself with, your children, your partner or even your friends.

If you or someone you know wants to work on their own behaviour please contact us. connect@theyoutrust.org.uk

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