Escape Site

Self and wellbeing

It’s important to find time in our daily lives to focus on ourselves. In today’s blog, Louise Newland, a YOU Counsellor, look at what wellbeing and self-care means.

Wellbeing and self-care

Wellbeing and self-care are terms often thrown about. They are terms everyone is expected to understand. But what does it actually mean to me in ‘my life’?

I am a full-time mum and a full-time employee who works across two jobs. Yes, there is a fair amount of juggling and balancing going on there, and then there is the housework, shopping and everything else that a parent finds themselves doing.

So, where does the wellbeing and self-care fit in? Can it? Should it? I definitely believe that yes is the reply to both of those questions, but if I am honest, I struggle with the how.

The how of wellness…

When my time seems so full and I feel stretched and giving all that I can, how can I give more?  Or should I cut something out to put them in?

My experience is that planning and balance can create opportunities to fulfil this goal. For example, I am often up before anyone else in the house and I have taken to using that 20-minute lull to sit quietly with a cup of tea and a book. Reading is my escape and I find that it supports my wellbeing by transporting me to different times, places and beings. I find myself centred and then at the allotted time, I am ready to go and take on the family and the world.

It may be small, but as the saying goes, “from small acorns, mighty trees grow”. A small amount of ‘me time’ has the potential to allow me to grow.

If you believe you may need help with wellness please contact one of our YOU Counselling Centres.

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